Posts Tagged 'New York Times'

Bigwigs in the NYT Newsroom

The above shot, from New York Times photographer Todd Heisler, is a somewhat rare look at the New York Times behind the scenes (that’s Editor Bill Keller and Managing Editor John Geddes talking something over)….

Source: mediabistro

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Lynsey Addario Talks About “Selfish” Job to NPR

Photo: Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs

New York Times photographer Lynsey Addario was on NPR’s “Morning Edition” today talking about her recent time in captivity in Libya. I was surprised at how giddy and upbeat she was in recounting her ordeal, but maybe that’s her way of coping. Or maybe a capture of that nature really isn’t a big deal to war correspondents. But their Libyan driver has not been seen or heard from since that day and he may well have been killed, so while it may be routine for the journalists, it had some pretty awful consequences for someone else.

When host Renee Montagne asked Addario if she would be taking a break now, she replied yes, but it was clear that break meant something like weeks, not long-term. She said: “It’s a selfish profession. Unfortunately I’m very committed to what I do. This is what I’ve done for 15 years. I believe very strongly that the world needs to see what’s happening.”

Source: NPR

NYT Journalists Recount Captivity In Libya

If you haven’t read it already, the four New York Times journalists, Anthony Shadid, Lynsey Addario, Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks, who were abducted in Libya, held for six days and released yesterday, have written an account of their time in captivity. The piece recounts their at times brutal treatment at the hands of Col. Qaddafi’s loyalist forces.

A half-hour later, we arrived on what we thought were the outskirts of the other side of Ajdabiya. A man whom soldiers called the sheik questioned us, then began taunting Tyler. “You have a beautiful head,” he told Tyler in a mix of English and Arabic. “I’m going to remove it and put it on mine. I’m going to cut it off.” Tyler, feeling queasy, asked to sit down.

Sadly, they believe their driver, Mohammed, died as a result of their capture.

If he died, we will have to bear the burden for the rest of our lives that an innocent man died because of us, because of wrong choices that we made, for an article that was never worth dying for.

It does make you think of the cost involved in covering stories like this and if it’s worth it. All four journalists said they’d had scary run-ins or close calls before. Despite the whole maybe-my-nine-lives-are-running-out thing, I’m willing to bet this will not deter them from covering future conflicts, though.

Source: New York Times

Photojournalism and the Hipstamatic App

Photo by Damon Winter/New York Times

UPDATE: Damon Winter won POYi’s Newspaper Photographer of the Year too.

When New York Times staff photographer Damon Winter won third place in POYi’s feature competition last week for wartime photos he took on his iPhone using the Hipstamatic app, some people balked. Photojournalism, as practiced by the greats with real cameras, was officially dead. Others said that’s a naive viewpoint; there are no truly objective photographs — and the photographer’s tool doesn’t make or break a great image.

To me, they look a little like ads, or still photography from a David O. Russell film. It doesn’t strike me as great photojournalism, despite Winter being a very skilled photographer, no doubt. That said, maybe I’m old fashioned. There is something about the purity of classic photojournalism that resonates more for me.

As for Winter’s take, he couldn’t submit to an interview with Poynter.org on Friday because he is in Afghanistan, but he did release a statement to the media site.

In part, it says:

I could not have taken these photos using my SLR and that perhaps is the most important point regarding my use of the camera phone for this story. Using the phone is discreet and casual and unintimidating. The soldiers often take pictures of each other with their phones and that was the hope of this essay: to have a set of photos that could almost look like the snapshots that the men take of each other but with a professional eye.

People may have the impression that it is too easy to make interesting images with a camera app like this, but that is not the case — just as it is not the case that good pictures automatically come out of exotic places. At the heart of every solid image are the same fundamentals: composition, information, moment, emotion, connection. If people think that this is a magic tool that makes every image great, they are wrong.

Surprisingly, NY Perps Sport Yankees Caps


Source: NYPD

Calling it a “curious phenomenon,” the New York Times is reporting that “dozens of men and women who have robbed, beaten, stabbed and shot at their fellow New Yorkers have done so while wearing Yankees caps or clothing.”

(This is sort of like when the Times tries to make a trend story out of three people they find feeling one way or doing a particular activity — like women who embrace their A-cup status.)

It’s a big joke. What do they expect from people in New York … green Celtics caps? I’m sure they’re wearing Yankees or Mets t-shirts, too, because guess what? People usually wear their hometown sports team gear.

I wonder if the NYPD will start unlawfully harassing Yankees cap wearers just like they do with photographers….

Article from New York Times

NYPD Rankled Over Javits Center Photos

The New York Times’ Lens blog reports today on photographers’ rights, noting the case of photographer George Hahn, who was recently harassed by an undercover officer while taking a nighttime photo of the Javits Center in New York City. Hahn says that he was on a public sidewalk, but that didn’t stop the officer from barking out a gruff, pointed, “Can I help you?” (No, Officer, I usually prefer to work alone….)

There are terrorists and there are architecture enthusiasts. You’d think the NYPD would be able to distinguish between the two, wouldn’t you?

Article from Lens

Cool Photography Round-Up

• Art director/designer Andrew Faris documented New York City, one Polaroid at a time. Even though the images are often of mundane things, it’s really well done and cool-looking, especially when seen all together. [Andrew Faris]

• 25 elite AP photographers are now available for children’s portraits, weddings, bar mitzvahs or other affairs. Not really…but they are available for hire to other media outlets, schedule permitting. [PDNPulse]

• Take a photo on Sunday, May 2 at 11 a.m. (EST) and send it into the New York Times’ Lens blog for their project  aiming to document “one moment in time across the world.” The photos will almost immediately appear on the web site and viewers can then scroll through them according to topic, country or whatever. [New York Times]

• On Greg Ceo’s blog he’s offering to send along your interesting photography projects to the editor at American Photo or feature them on his own blog’s “New Photographer Monday.” [Greg Ceo]

• And, similarly, on A Photo Editor’s blog, there’s a (different) photo editor looking for “projects related to the economy: foreclosure, stimulus construction, homelessness, unemployment.” Leave a comment or send links in an email. [A Photo Editor]


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