Posts Tagged 'YouTube'

Photography Link Roundup

Photo by Hamidou Maiga

•  80-year-old photographer Hamidou Maiga has been doing studio photography since the 1950s, documenting villagers, dignitaries and artists in Mali in West Africa. Only now are his photos getting attention from the western world, including his first solo exhibit in London. He said: “I became well known in these parts – everyone knew my name. The studio became a site where people would meet and exchange ideas.” [Dazed Digital

•  I don’t know jump shots, but Sports Illustrated’s cover shot of BYU’s Jimmer Fredette is apparently pretty awesome. [The Dagger]

•  Guillaume Janot’s series, “Welcome Home,” captures scenes at a Beijing Ikea. By way of explanation, Ikea is more of a destination than an errand in Beijing, and visitors  might spend the day chatting on the furniture or even sleeping on the beds. [ARTINFO

•  A selection of some of the many front pages all over the world that featured Reuters photographer Goran Tomasevic’s striking shot of a convoy explosion in Libya. [Reuters]

•  YouTube knows not everyone has access to a camera, so they’re launching a portal (at YouTube.com/create) where you can build a video clip by using third-party apps. [TechCrunch]

Mystery Film’s Owners Found

Todd Bieber, the extremely dogged finder of a roll of film in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, finally tracked down its owners after a five-country journey through Europe. (Does this guy have no job and unlimited funds? Amazing.) He met up with them in Paris in a reunion he called awkward.

As the Lookout blog reports:

It turns out the photos were taken by a French student temporarily studying in America named Camille, whose brother was visiting her in New York when the storm hit. Camille’s ex-roommate wrote to Bieber to say that she thought the photos were taken by Camille because she recognized the block outside her apartment.

In another universe, a New York City sanitation worker would have found the film and just thrown it away….

Found in a Brooklyn Blizzard: Update

A few weeks back the lovely story of a lost roll of film in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park swept the internet. After breathless media stories from Time to “The Today Show,” 1.2 million hits on YouTube and thousands of proffered theories, there’s an update … of sorts.

Found in a Brooklyn Blizzard: One Roll of Film

He could have just posted “found” signs on telephone polls, but this is 2011 and when you find something, you make a quirky, cute “This American Life”-style video and hope it goes viral. The story: a man decides he needs adventure in his life this year, he finds a roll of undeveloped film in Brooklyn’s snow-covered Prospect Park, develops it, and then produces a short video in an effort to track down the owners.

Source: Gawker

LAPD Sergeant Fires Away on YouTube

While YouTube is great fun for silly cat videos and clips of kids freaking out after the dentist, it’s also fertile ground for angry, arrogant, illiterate people. Exhibit A:

“your a dick ? what would u wanna video/pictures? a dead guy.. what the fuck are you gona do with the video of a dead guy.. get a life you fuking cunt,”

Interestingly, the comment was left by AbawiTariq, a sergeant with the LAPD, according to his YouTube profile.

Nothing but the best in Los Angeles. Seriously, Chief Beck – that is who you want representing your force?


Who is YouTube Member “8Bwv”?

“Yeah go fuck yourself  man. Your a low life scum bag. I would love to meet you  so I could stab you in your fuckin neck. You whinny pussy piece of shit.”

Over the past two years or so, we have received plenty of disparaging comments from various people on YouTube, but this one from “8Bwv” (which was left July 30, 2010) is probably one of the angriest and most threatening comments that we have had the pleasure of reading.

If anybody knows who YouTube member “8Bwv” is, please let us know.

You Have Rights, Sure – If It’s On Tape


Pogan-Long incident.


Honrohoe-Vazquez incident.

Is the difference between a cop being reprimanded for illegal actions a good-quality YouTube video? Well, yeah.

The New York Times uses the cases of two bicyclists who were knocked to the ground by members of the NYPD to illustrate the point. In one video, from 2008, Officer Patrick Pogan was just convicted after video emerged of him deliberately putting his shoulder into the path of cyclist Christopher Long, sending him flying. In the other video, from 2007, the actions of Officer Timothy Horohoe aren’t seen but for a split-second before cyclist Richard Vazquez crashes to the ground. Vazquez sued the NYPD and settled for $98,000 and Horohoe did not face any serious charges.

“Pogan, it’s 15 seconds,” [Vazquez's lawyer Wylie] Stecklow said. “You see that boom; it’s not hard for anybody to look at that for 15 seconds and think they understand what happened. That’s why I think that took off and became viral. The Horohoe case, there’s a lot of nuance you have to understand.”

So, the takeaway lesson we learn from this is that your rights aren’t really ensured unless you or someone else is able to capture it on tape. And capture it well. It pays to travel with a cinematographer.

Article from New York Times (via Gawker)



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